Lukewarm vs. Pretty Cool.

Certain things are not meant to be lukewarm.
Showers. Hot Chocolate. Eggs. Gravy. Relationships.
. . . and why not “dougwarm” or “anniewarm”?
Research shows the word “lukewarm” popped up around the 14th century as meaning “slightly warm”.  “Luke” is derived from “lew” or “lewk” or “leuk”, in Middle English, which meant “tepid” (slightly warm). This in turn came from the Old English adverb “hlēowe,” which means “warm or sunny.” Additionally, “hlēowe” came from the Proto-Germanic “hlēwaz,” meaning “warm.” Within two centuries, it also began having a figurative meaning, that of “lacking in enthusiasm.”
Here in the United States, lukewarm tends to connote “less than” warm . . . as in, were things to be ideal, what you have in front of you (hot chocolate, eggs, a first date) should be warmer. . . and warmer would be better, if not best.
At Davis Creative, we don’t do lukewarm.
Our clients reach out to us because they know they will never get “lukewarm” nor “almost.” We don’t do things “almost” . . . we do them right the first time, with enthusiasm, excitement and eagerness.
You deserve the best, you expect the best, you get the best. 
Now . . . if you are Dutch, and just happen to be living in the US . . . and just happen to be working with Davis Creative, feel free to use the word, “leuk” (pronounced LUKE). Research also shows that the Dutch currently use this word as in “cool” or “nice.”
So, if you like the services we have provided for you, please feel free to respond enthusiastically with “LEUK!”
We’ll think you are pretty-cool, too.