Tell Your Story

Raise Your Voice

If you grew up reading Dr. Seuss, you are probably quite familiar with “Horton Hears a Who” (originally published August 12, 1954), the metaphorical story of many tiny voices joining together in a chorus loud enough to be heard. The story resonated with me as a child, and seems to be an appropriate metaphor for the state of our planet lately.

Just as in the Dr. Seuss book, if you listen to ANY news program recently, you hear many voices throughout the world simultaneously asking to be heard. Voices shouting of decades and generations — if not centuries — of persecution based upon race, color, gender, nationality, physical or mental abilities, sexual orientation, religion, family culture or politics . . . and more. Many voices, joining in chorus, to find a better way of living, loving and learning to co-exist.

As a female growing up in mid-America, living with my Mother and Stepfather, I remember the exact day when I was told my voice did not count — third grade, just before dinner. I don’t recall the subject of the conversation, but I vaguely remember my Stepfather asking me to do something (probably set the table or such). My independent 8-year-old-self told him, “No thank you, I’m busy.” At which point, my Mother explained I was not allowed to tell an adult, “no”, let alone a MALE adult. Now, granted, this was early 1960’s, and the most popular show on TV was “Father Knows Best”.

I’m sorry to say, but it wasn’t until recently (when the “me too” campaign came to light) that this memory came full-circle, and I began to realize how much of an impact that one conversation has had on every male relationship I’ve had over the past 50-plus years.

I’ve never been one to silence my opinion, but now I understand better WHY I offer my opinions. In my heart, I knew my WHY matters. My WHY comes from not understanding what my Mother was telling me, nor agreeing with it, but knowing I definitely needed to follow my Mother’s lead in order to stay safe. My WHY fuels my passion to help others find their voice and tell their story.

WHAT IS YOUR WHY?

Everyone has a story. Many have stories which need to be told.

As a helper-and-healer, you too (more-than-likely), have a story to tell. What motivates you to help YOUR clients? We’ve identified three main “helping” themes in the hundreds of books we’ve published . . .

As a small business owner, having a non-fiction book is one of the most highly-successful marketing tools to help you . . .

  • Establish Your Credibility
  • Inspire More People
  • Project a Professional Image
  • Develop Greater Visibility for Your Business
  • Attract, Retain and Solidify Your Client Base

That’s where we come in.

As Professional Author Consultants, we help you tell your story, with one of the most experienced staff in the independent self-publishing industry. Our writing coaches teach business owners to become authors and our publishing consultants teach you how to be your own publisher, avoid the self-publishing pitfalls, and keep 100% of your royalties.

If you are ready for your voice to be heard, reach out . . . email me or give me a call.

Last week, one of my key referral sources called me her “Publishing Sherpa”. I hold your hand, walk you through the process, and guarantee a pain-free delivery of your book to your doorstep. Really. It’s much easer than childbirth.

The Story Matters

We’ve all seen the t-shirts about how “Punctuation Matters” . . .

And I recently learned first-hand how much placing your words in the correct order ALSO matters.

My entire life, I’ve heard the family story about how one of my Miller ancestors married a Cherokee maiden back during the Trail of Tears era. I have Cherokee documents showing both my Mother and Grandmother’s membership in the Cherokee Nation. It was simply understood as “fact” that I had inherited my Cherokee DNA from a female ancestor.

 

Enter the power of 2017 technology through Ancestry.com and Facebook. A distant cousin posted on Facebook that she was doing some research, and ran across a hand-written letter from the 1800’s which had been scanned into Ancestry.com. It told the story about the actual origin of our family’s Cherokee heritage.

As romantic as the original family story was, come to find out, it may not be all that accurate. It seems the Millers lived above their General Store, in an area now known to overlap the borders of Oklahoma and Kansas – right along the path of the Trail of Tears. To their dismay, they awoke one morning to discover a small Cherokee boy sitting outside of their establishment. According to the letter, he had gotten lost or left behind, and they immediately adopted him as one of their own.

So, rather than the original story being told as . . .

“A Miller married a Cherokee maiden during the Trail of Tears era.”

It should have been told as . . .

“A small Cherokee boy, lost on the Trail of Tears,
was adopted by the Miller family and grew up to marry a maiden.”

This throws a whole new light on the subject of ancestral DNA . . . where DNA also stands for “Do Not Assume”.

This new info does not dispute our Cherokee heritage . . . BUT for those family members who are trying to connect the dots on the family tree, this creates a whole new grand adventure of exploration down another “limb” of this newly-found maiden’s heritage.

So, whether you are writing your family history or making history by being the first in your family to write a book and grow your business, we can help.

And we promise to help you put your words in the proper order.

To learn more about how our Branding and Publishing programs can help you tell YOUR story, give us call at 888-598-0886.