Posts Tagged ‘brand strategy’

Yesterday, I quit.

YESTERDAY, I QUIT . . .

I quit thinking small.

I quit thinking I need to do it all myself.

I quit discounting my talent and services.

I quit thinking I am supposed to know how to do everything.

TODAY, I  BELIEVE . . .

I believe I only attract those people who are excited to be working with me.

I believe I’ve “GOT THIS”!

I believe it’s OK to take breaks during the day and let my mind rest while NOT working.

I believe what I do contributes to the positive awakening of the world.

And tomorrow . . . I TRUST everything will work out just dandy.

Because, after all . . .

Lukewarm vs. Pretty Cool.

Certain things are not meant to be lukewarm.
Showers. Hot Chocolate. Eggs. Gravy. Relationships.
. . . and why not “dougwarm” or “anniewarm”?
Research shows the word “lukewarm” popped up around the 14th century as meaning “slightly warm”.  “Luke” is derived from “lew” or “lewk” or “leuk”, in Middle English, which meant “tepid” (slightly warm). This in turn came from the Old English adverb “hlēowe,” which means “warm or sunny.” Additionally, “hlēowe” came from the Proto-Germanic “hlēwaz,” meaning “warm.” Within two centuries, it also began having a figurative meaning, that of “lacking in enthusiasm.”
Here in the United States, lukewarm tends to connote “less than” warm . . . as in, were things to be ideal, what you have in front of you (hot chocolate, eggs, a first date) should be warmer. . . and warmer would be better, if not best.
At Davis Creative, we don’t do lukewarm.
Our clients reach out to us because they know they will never get “lukewarm” nor “almost.” We don’t do things “almost” . . . we do them right the first time, with enthusiasm, excitement and eagerness.
You deserve the best, you expect the best, you get the best. 
Now . . . if you are Dutch, and just happen to be living in the US . . . and just happen to be working with Davis Creative, feel free to use the word, “leuk” (pronounced LUKE). Research also shows that the Dutch currently use this word as in “cool” or “nice.”
So, if you like the services we have provided for you, please feel free to respond enthusiastically with “LEUK!”
We’ll think you are pretty-cool, too.

Fireworks Get Noticed

My mother’s birthday was July 4th.

And, YES, she was one heck of a FIRECRACKER. She LOVED being the focus of attention, and knew how to make that happen.

She always led with her “sparkling” personality, and it always served her well. Even after she moved to a nursing home, she landed on the front page of the Webster Kirkwood Times at least twice.

As I look back, I now realize (in her own way), she was teaching me to be a “Firecracker”. . .

After all . . . Fireworks Get Noticed.

I now use my Mom’s “how-to-be-a-firecracker lessons” for creating my own “Fireworks” in business:

  • GREET and introduce yourself to everyone you meet.
  • SMILE and the world smiles back (she wrote this one in her high school year book).
  • SPARKLE and always dress to impress — whether it’s your wardrobe or your website.
  • GIVE of your Time, Treasure and Talent.
  • COMMUNITY — surround yourself with supportive people.
  • PERSISTENCE — if there is something you want, ASK for it.
  • HAVE FUN — people want to work with people who are having fun.

If you are in business for yourself, and are ready to get noticed, give me a shout . . . I bet we can create some great fireworks together . . . I learned from the best!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MOM!

Fuzzy Brands Breed BANAL Benefits

ba·nal
bəˈnäl,bəˈnal/
adjective

D: So lacking in originality as to be obvious and boring.

I learned the word BANAL from my mother.  She LOVED crossword puzzles, and as it became more difficult for her to see, I would sit with her at the nursing home, asking her the clues as she rattled off the answers with lightning speed.
She had most of the answers memorized from years of subscribing to the same puzzle magazine.  She knew the answer by how they asked the question.  She knew the answer would change, depending upon whether we were looking for a 5-letter word vs. a 7-letter word.  She learned to rely upon repetition, consistency and memory.  
That’s why it was important when I went to replenish her inventory with new crossword puzzle books, I was told (by her) to look for a specific publisher – a specific brand – the “EASY Crosswords” by Dell Magazines.  I’m pretty certain my mother was not their only loyal fan “for life”.
So how did Dell turn mundane crossword puzzles
into a “gotta have” brand?
REPETITION:  Brand awareness is one of the most important things you can build for your business.  You want customers to recognize your brand when they see it. You want to create a specific emotional response in the viewer when they come into contact with your brand.  Many customers  will still remain loyal to a brand they love, even it that means paying a little more for it.
CONSISTENCY:  Consistency makes your brand feel more dependable.  Part of engaging a positive emotion with your consumer is to make them feel like they know your brand and that your brand can be trusted.  They learn to know what to expect and they know they will like the outcome.  Putting a consistent brand message in front of consumers is one strong step in the right direction to attracting new customers.
MEMORY:  Everything your customer and prospects remember about your company through interaction, products, advertising, events, etc. contributes to the overall lasting impression of your “brand”, be it positive or not.  Brand memory occurs when you share a consistent visual, verbal and virtual brand message, and is a major step towards letting consumers get to know you.
Just like my mother, as she became increasingly more familiar with the “Easy Crosswords“, nothing else would suffice – which is the ultimate definition of Brand Loyalty.
When consumers learn to know, like and trust you, they are more likely to purchase from you and more likely to recommend you to others.
It’s really that Easy.
PS:  Thanks, Mom, for giving me the love of language! 

HUMMING IN COLOR

“Painting” said Pooh, “is like humming in color”

Handing someone a generic business card or marketing piece tells them your company is . . . well,  generic. 

IMG_7518

Offering well-thought-out marketing materials (from business cards to website banners) tells your audience you are excited about and proud of what you do, and want to share what you know. It doesn’t matter whether you are a financial planner or a tattoo artist, utilizing color or black-and-white — how you “paint the picture” of your business creates your visual brand.

You become memorable.

Choosing color to represent your business is much more than picking your favorite color. Different colors evoke different subliminal psychological responses. That’s why hospitals traditionally don’t use orange, yet Home Depot does.

What message does your business “hum”?

 

BRAND STRATEGY

Making Your Brand “FEEL” Good.

SO . . . How DOES your brand make your customer feel?

Brands have an emotional appeal. Consciously, or sub-consciously, people have feelings about your brand. It’s the reason why some consumers buy Heinz ketchup, and others buy Hunt’s; it’s the same with iPhone vs. Blackberry — loyal followers for each claim their choice is best. A successful brand creates the perception that there is no other product/service on the market quite like yours.

Brand Equation
 

A “FEEL GOOD” brand occurs when you:Define, Design, Deliver

  • DEFINE your business focus.
  • DESIGN your business image.
  • DELIVER your business message.

IN THE NEWS

4 Ways to Block Brand Competition

INC Magazine LogoBy Gabrielle M. Blue   |    Feb 28, 2011

Is your company’s brand unique, innovative, and rock-solid enough to not only capture and hold customer loyalty, but also to dominate the market by knocking out the competition?

It takes a lot more than a good product to ensure customer loyalty – and even more to maintain a competitive edge in the marketplace. Consumers today associate with a product or service through their connection with a company’s brand. That’s why it’s more important, as a business owner, to make sure your company’s brand is unique, innovative, and rock-solid enough to not only capture and hold customer loyalty, but also to dominant in the market by knocking out the competition. More . . .