Posts Tagged ‘graphic design’

Lukewarm vs. Pretty Cool.

Certain things are not meant to be lukewarm.
Showers. Hot Chocolate. Eggs. Gravy. Relationships.
. . . and why not “dougwarm” or “anniewarm”?
Research shows the word “lukewarm” popped up around the 14th century as meaning “slightly warm”.  “Luke” is derived from “lew” or “lewk” or “leuk”, in Middle English, which meant “tepid” (slightly warm). This in turn came from the Old English adverb “hlēowe,” which means “warm or sunny.” Additionally, “hlēowe” came from the Proto-Germanic “hlēwaz,” meaning “warm.” Within two centuries, it also began having a figurative meaning, that of “lacking in enthusiasm.”
Here in the United States, lukewarm tends to connote “less than” warm . . . as in, were things to be ideal, what you have in front of you (hot chocolate, eggs, a first date) should be warmer. . . and warmer would be better, if not best.
At Davis Creative, we don’t do lukewarm.
Our clients reach out to us because they know they will never get “lukewarm” nor “almost.” We don’t do things “almost” . . . we do them right the first time, with enthusiasm, excitement and eagerness.
You deserve the best, you expect the best, you get the best. 
Now . . . if you are Dutch, and just happen to be living in the US . . . and just happen to be working with Davis Creative, feel free to use the word, “leuk” (pronounced LUKE). Research also shows that the Dutch currently use this word as in “cool” or “nice.”
So, if you like the services we have provided for you, please feel free to respond enthusiastically with “LEUK!”
We’ll think you are pretty-cool, too.

HUMMING IN COLOR

“Painting” said Pooh, “is like humming in color”

Handing someone a generic business card or marketing piece tells them your company is . . . well,  generic. 

IMG_7518

Offering well-thought-out marketing materials (from business cards to website banners) tells your audience you are excited about and proud of what you do, and want to share what you know. It doesn’t matter whether you are a financial planner or a tattoo artist, utilizing color or black-and-white — how you “paint the picture” of your business creates your visual brand.

You become memorable.

Choosing color to represent your business is much more than picking your favorite color. Different colors evoke different subliminal psychological responses. That’s why hospitals traditionally don’t use orange, yet Home Depot does.

What message does your business “hum”?

 

TYPOGRAPHY

When Typography Meets a Needle, a Thread and a Book

July 12, 2012     |   designtaxi.com ThreadBook

I have a life-long love of typography, books and fiber art, so when I ran across this story that combines ALL THREE into this one-of-a-kind handmade book, I was quite excited!

Poland-based artist Iwona Przybyla threaded string through sheets of paper to create a book that ‘pops-up’ letters of the alphabet.

The typography book, entitled ‘Kąt 90 stopni (90 degrees)‘, showcases the 26 letters of the English alphabet — each intricately sewn with light and dark blue string so that when the book opens at 90-degrees at any page, a 3D letter appears.

View the entire alphabet here . . .

DESIGN FOR BUSINESS

What’s YOUR Type?

Does this font make me “look big”?

Ever since Typography Class in college (yes, we spent an entire year analyzing and “designing” new fonts), the language of fonts and their subliminal messaging continues to fascinate me. Choosing the right fonts — whether for your logo, your annual report or your next book cover — sets the tone for how your business is perceived.

Traditionally, financial services have always been known to use a SERIF font from the Times Roman family to emote trust, stability, authority (as in the ING example) — but even that has changed over the years in an effort to be portrayed as less “stodgy” and more “current” (as in the US Bank example).

 
ING bank

 

Choosing your “TYPE” is much more than just picking your favorite font from your computer.

IN THE NEWS

DESIGN THINKING . . . What is That?

BY MARK DZIERSK FastCompany

The methodology commonly referred to as “Design Thinking” is a proven and repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession can employ to achieve extraordinary results.

Although Design is most often used to describe an object or end result, Design in its most effective form is a process, an action, a verb not a noun. A protocol for solving problems and discovering new opportunities. Techniques and tools differ and their effectiveness are arguable but the core of the process stays the same. It’s taken years of slogging through Design = high style to bring us full circle to the simple truth about design thinking. That it is a most powerful tool and when used effectively, can be the foundation for driving a brand or business forward.

Basically, Design Thinking consists of four key elements.
Read more here . . .

Good Design is Good Business.

Design Matters — especially if your business matters to you.

As we welcome 2012, and look back over 2011, we notice a trend in the types of projects that consistently come our way. With that in mind, we have renamed our e-news, “Design Matters,” where we will continue to share monthly “tips, trends and tales,” as they pertain to our three primary lines of business:

  1. DESIGN FOR BUSINESS. More than great graphic design, we help our clients create a great identity with strategic design concepts — from custom logos, to business marketing materials, to web-based graphics. With over 25 years experience (each) in working for for Fortune 100 and Fortune Top-10 corporations, we bring a global perspective with a micro-level insight to help their clients “Define, Design & Deliver” their message to their consumer.
  2. DESIGN FOR PUBLISHING. Great book design is more than ink on paper. We work with authors and publicists across the country to help design books that sell. As a certified Professional Author Consultant, Cathy serves as Publishing Project Manager, helping authors navigate the self-publishing process — from creating connections with ghost-writers and editors, through cover and interior design, through printing, marketing and promotion.
  3. DESIGN FOR LIFE. Planting Seeds of Positive Perspective at UPSIdaisy.com, this “one-time-hobby” website grew by leaps and bounds in 2011, and our custom designs were printed on a variety of products and shipped all around the world. Our messages of hope, inspiration and humor touched households in the US, Great Britain, Australia, Canada, the Solomon Islands, Italy, Portugal, Ireland and more!

We hope you continue to follow us we create positive ripples — be it around the corner or around the globe.