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Posts Tagged ‘brand relief’

Fuzzy Brands Breed BANAL Benefits

ba·nal
bəˈnäl,bəˈnal/
adjective

D: So lacking in originality as to be obvious and boring.

I learned the word BANAL from my mother.  She LOVED crossword puzzles, and as it became more difficult for her to see, I would sit with her at the nursing home, asking her the clues as she rattled off the answers with lightning speed.
She had most of the answers memorized from years of subscribing to the same puzzle magazine.  She knew the answer by how they asked the question.  She knew the answer would change, depending upon whether we were looking for a 5-letter word vs. a 7-letter word.  She learned to rely upon repetition, consistency and memory.  
That’s why it was important when I went to replenish her inventory with new crossword puzzle books, I was told (by her) to look for a specific publisher – a specific brand – the “EASY Crosswords” by Dell Magazines.  I’m pretty certain my mother was not their only loyal fan “for life”.
So how did Dell turn mundane crossword puzzles
into a “gotta have” brand?
REPETITION:  Brand awareness is one of the most important things you can build for your business.  You want customers to recognize your brand when they see it. You want to create a specific emotional response in the viewer when they come into contact with your brand.  Many customers  will still remain loyal to a brand they love, even it that means paying a little more for it.
CONSISTENCY:  Consistency makes your brand feel more dependable.  Part of engaging a positive emotion with your consumer is to make them feel like they know your brand and that your brand can be trusted.  They learn to know what to expect and they know they will like the outcome.  Putting a consistent brand message in front of consumers is one strong step in the right direction to attracting new customers.
MEMORY:  Everything your customer and prospects remember about your company through interaction, products, advertising, events, etc. contributes to the overall lasting impression of your “brand”, be it positive or not.  Brand memory occurs when you share a consistent visual, verbal and virtual brand message, and is a major step towards letting consumers get to know you.
Just like my mother, as she became increasingly more familiar with the “Easy Crosswords“, nothing else would suffice – which is the ultimate definition of Brand Loyalty.
When consumers learn to know, like and trust you, they are more likely to purchase from you and more likely to recommend you to others.
It’s really that Easy.
PS:  Thanks, Mom, for giving me the love of language! 

BRAND STRATEGY

Making Your Brand “FEEL” Good.

SO . . . How DOES your brand make your customer feel?

Brands have an emotional appeal. Consciously, or sub-consciously, people have feelings about your brand. It’s the reason why some consumers buy Heinz ketchup, and others buy Hunt’s; it’s the same with iPhone vs. Blackberry — loyal followers for each claim their choice is best. A successful brand creates the perception that there is no other product/service on the market quite like yours.

Brand Equation
 

A “FEEL GOOD” brand occurs when you:Define, Design, Deliver

  • DEFINE your business focus.
  • DESIGN your business image.
  • DELIVER your business message.

IN THE NEWS

How to Design a Brand

TOM ASAKER  |  Author, speaker and provocateur  |  2/16/12

I was recently turned on to the legendary designer Dieter Rams, whose comments below were made three decades ago during a speech to the supervisory board of Braun:
“Good designers must always be avant-gardists,
always one step ahead of the times. They should,
and must, question everything generally
thought to be obvious. . .” 
. . . So I’ve decided to appropriate Dieter’s ethos and apply it to designing a “good” brand; one that creates growth in profitability, as well as happy and healthy, holistic relationships. I’ve specifically referenced his “Ten Principles for Good Design” from his book “Weniger, aber besser” (“Less, but better”). I hope I’ve done justice to the spirit of his timeless words . . .

Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen

Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen . . . CAN “Spoil the Pot” and Spoil Your Brand Impact

Small business owners — especially solo-preneurs — tend to ask everyone they meet for an opinion when it comes to marketing. They fall prey to the DELUSION that the more people they ask, the more they will learn about how to market their business. Trick is . . . for every person they ask, they are guaranteed to get a different opinion, which quite often leaves the business owner even more confused.

Unfortunately, this DELUSION leads to brand DILUTION.

Avoid the Dilution of your Brand Message through Visual, Verbal and Virtual Consistency. 

If you are not comfortable in making marketing decisions, hand that responsibility over to ONE trusted partner. Having one primary marketing partner to help you craft your overall brand strategy will create a clear and consistent marketing message.

  1. Visual Message. Scattering your design projects among several designers will do just that — scatter your image and create confusion. Develop a visual brand strategy that supports your brand message and stick to ONE professional designer that understands visual brand strategy.
  2. Verbal Message. There is so much more to writing marketing copy than stringing words together into a sentence. Your consumer is more likely to remember you when you have a consistent tone and message written by ONE professional writer/editor.
  3. Virtual Message. Not all web designers are web developers (and vice-versa). If you are lucky, you’ll find one that does both. The same goes for SEO and/or Social Media — trust ONE expert to set you up with a customized plan.

Resist the Delusion of Getting Something for Free.  

Barter is not always best. Smarter is best. Everyone is on a budget and looking for ways to stretch a dollar, yet if the outcome of your “trade for services” brings about chaos and confusion with your consumer, then you have essentially gotten what you paid for (nothing), and you’ve wasted everyone’s time (which by the way, is valuable). Choose “smarter” — and make decisions based upon what is best for your brand message.

Trust Your Instincts. 

At your gut level, you know what is best for your business. Learn to trust those instincts. Avoid the temptation to “collect” a cadre of disparate designers, writers and web developers — find a few key players whom you trust to help you develop your “big picture” brand and trust them to help you craft a consistent brand message. Creating a clear and consistent Visual, Verbal and Virtual message for your consumer serves to clarify and solidify your brand and strengthen your client/consumer relationships  – and will cost you less in the long run.

Mindful Marketing: BELIEVE

BELIEVE in your product or service.Kashi-sm

When you BELIEVE in what you offer, you create a passion that motivates your consumer to purchase. Identify the FEELING you want your consumer to have with each purchase, and you are on your way to increased sales.

Kashi actively markets the healthy lifestyle by building a community of health-conscious fans. Through the company’s focus on health and wellness, Kashi exemplifies how to build a personal brand that makes consumer relationships a priority.

Each year since 1995, leading food industry expert, Julian Mellentin, forecasts and analyzes trends in food, nutrition and health. Indicators show that food and beverages which provide a benefit that consumers can actually FEEL will be best placed to weather the global economic downturn.

“In tough times the single most important factor consumers will take into account when choosing a functional food or drink will be whether it delivers a benefit they can feel,” says Mellentin.

The importance of “feel the benefit” is even more important when people are being more careful with their money.

“Products that lack a quick and easy-to-feel effect could be in trouble,” Mellentin observes.

At Kashi, the most loyal “BELIEVERS” sign up to become a Kashi “Fan Addict” – giving them added benefits such as coupons, weekly newsletters and access to special promotions.

Does your consumer BELIEVE in your product? Can they FEEL your benefit?

Serving Up a Campaign that Cares

Mindful Marketing: SERVEDove

Offer a product or service that “serves” your consumer.

  • Do your research
  • Find your niche
  • Fill a void
  • Offer relief

The DOVE Campaign for Real Beauty was inspired by a major global study, “The Real Truth About Beauty: A Global Report”. The study validated the hypothesis that the definition of beauty had become limiting and unattainable, as if only thin, young and blond were beautiful. DOVE found the current, narrow definition of beauty was having a profound effect on the self-esteem of women:

  • only 2% of women around the world describe themselves as beautiful
  • 81% of women in the U.S. strongly agree that “the media and advertising set an unrealistic standard of beauty that most women can’t ever achieve”

The DOVE Campaign for Real Beauty was created to provoke discussion and encourage debate. Based upon the global study findings, DOVE started a series of communication campaigns to challenge beauty stereotypes and invite women to join in a discussion about beauty.

DOVE “served” their consumer and expanded their customer base by redefining beauty. Women want to be “understood”, and feel better about purchasing products with which they can identify.

How are you SERVING your consumer?